Ms Sim Ann, Senior Minister of State for Trade & Industry and Culture, Community and Youth, listening to St Anthony’s Canossian Primary School students as they explain the meaning behind some artworks.

By Jared Ng

The Canossian Sisters and three Canossian schools organised an art exhibition to celebrate racial and religious harmony in Singapore.

The three schools are St Anthony’s Canossian Primary and Secondary schools and Canossa Convent Primary School.

The Canossian Art Unites Exhibition, which had the theme Faith. Hope. Love, commemorated Racial Harmony Day and featured art works by students, teachers, Canossian Sisters, alumnae and representatives of various religious communities.

It aimed to promote a deeper understanding of love and acceptance among different races and religions.

Ms Sim Ann, Senior Minister of State for Trade & Industry and Culture, Community and Youth, was the guest-of-honour.

She was joined by representatives of various religious communities including Muslims, Hindus, Taoists, Baha’is and Sikhs.

Representatives of various religious communities present at the event. Left to right: Haji Abdul Razak Maricar (chief executive of Muis), Venerable Seck Kwang Phing, (president of Singapore Buddhist Federation) and Ustaz Mohamed Ali Atan (head, Harmony Centre, and chairman of An-Nahdhah Mosque).

“Racial and religious harmony is the critical factor for a peaceful Singapore and peaceful world,” said Sr Theresa Seow, provincial leader of the Canossian Sisters, during the event held on July 21 at the Visual Arts Centre at Dhoby Ghaut.

“When we of all races, all creeds band together as one, we erase hate and make way for something very powerful: faith, hope and love,” said Sr Theresa, who is also an Inter-Religious Organisation (IRO) council member.

The artworks on display used various media including embroidery, watercolour, photography, mixed media and ceramic.

Artists were encouraged to express, through their art pieces, the exhibition theme as well as incorporate a religious harmony element.

One exhibit featured iconic world personalities, another a montage of flowers and designs, and yet another had the words “faith”, “hope” and “love” embroidered on a colourful piece of cloth.


Sr Theresa Seow, provincial leader of the Canossian Sisters, speaking at the art exhibition on July 21.

Canossian Sr Janet Wang, who painted a picture of nine koi fish swimming, titled One Canossian in Faith, Hope and Love, shared with Catholic News her inspiration.

“I find the colours of the koi fish really beautiful and would often look at them swimming in the pond as part of my meditation,” said Sr Janet. “I chose to paint nine because of the number of [Canossian] schools, homes and kindergartens we have here in Singapore,” she said.

Sr Janet added that each school, home and kindergarten “is made up of children from different backgrounds and cultures.”

“It is similar to that of the koi fish because not all of them are alike, but they swim together, united,” said Sr Janet.

Rukshana Burzeen Driver, from the Parsi Zoroastrian Association of South East Asia, said her ink and acrylic painting was based on the “principles of my religion which are ‘good thoughts, good words and good deeds.’”

Titled The Blossom of Life, it shows an angel in the middle of these three Zoroastrian mottos.

“I wanted to do something about life so I added flowers representing the blossom of new life,” said the 16-year-old.


Rukshana Burzeen Driver, from the Parsi Zoroastrian Association of South East Asia, seen with her ink and acrylic painting titled The Blossom of Life.

Master Chung Kwang Tong shared the history behind an exhibited “ancient script” which he described as “the main scripture of the Taoist faith.”

According to Master Chung, the script on display was the final of 81 chapters and serves as “a reminder of how to practise good values and to be a good person.”

The art exhibition was open to the public from July 22-27. 


One of the artworks featured at the exhibition was a mixed media piece featuring iconic personalities both past and present.

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