NOVEMBER 29, 2015, Vol 65, No 24

Franciscan Friar Rowland Yeo will be the first deaf priest in Southeast Asia after his ordination on Nov 28.Franciscan Friar Rowland Yeo will be the first deaf priest in Southeast Asia after his ordination on Nov 28.
Deaf Franciscan Friar Rowland Yeo will be ordained to the priesthood on Nov 28.

He will be Southeast Asia’s first deaf priest, and only one of  25 such priests in the world.

The ordination Mass, presided by Archbishop William Goh, will be celebrated at the Church of St Mary of the Angels at Bukit Batok on Nov 28 at 10am.

The Mass will be in spoken English and sign language.

Friar Rowland will then celebrate his first public Mass the following day in sign language, with spoken English translation.

The Mass will be held at the Church of the Sacred Heart at 3pm.

Friar Rowland joined the Franciscans in 1997, and made his solemn profession of vows in 2003. He was ordained a deacon in June last year.
Pauline Sisters with (from left) Fr Edward Lim, Fr Valerian Cheong and Fr Terence Wee, and the St Damien Youth Choir performing during the Heavenly Voices Concert at the Church of the Risen Christ. PHOTOS: Vernon Leow of Vital ImagesPauline Sisters with (from left) Fr Edward Lim, Fr Valerian Cheong and Fr Terence Wee, and the St Damien Youth Choir performing during the Heavenly Voices Concert at the Church of the Risen Christ. PHOTOS: Vernon Leow of Vital Images
There were cheers all around as the Daughters of St Paul sang and danced at a concert held at the Church of the Risen Christ on Nov 14.

The delighted audience clapped as the nuns in habit swayed to the beat. At one point, the performers used glow sticks and smartphone lights, which soon had members of the audience doing the same.

These were just some of the fun highlights of the Heavenly Voices Concert attended by hundreds to celebrate the centennial of the Daughters of St Paul.

Another similar concert was held at the Church of Our Lady Perpetual Succour on Nov 13. Each concert attracted about 1,000 people.

Apart from the local nuns – Srs Wendy, Jocelyn, Karen and Theresa – Daughters of St Paul nuns from other countries also performed. They were Srs Tracey and Fay from the US, Srs Carmel and Mayan from the Philippines and Sr Roselyn from Kenya.
Clarity Singapore directors and Dr Amy Khor (fourth from right) at the charity’s fifth anniversary fundraising dinner.Clarity Singapore directors and Dr Amy Khor (fourth from right) at the charity’s fifth anniversary fundraising dinner.

It wasn’t your usual fundraising dinner.

For one thing, it began with a short talk on meditation and the 250 guests were even invited to enter into silence for 10 minutes.

However, the session – at the fifth anniversary fundraising dinner of mental health charity Clarity Singapore – was welcomed by many.

“I thought that to keep quiet for 10 minutes was long but as it turned out, it wasn’t that long and I felt good after that!” said one participant.

Mr Peter Ng, president of World Community of Christian Meditation Singapore, led the session at the dinner, which was themed Peace and Serenity through Clarity. He shared with the guests the benefits of meditation and silence.

Clarity chairman Joseph Tan told guests that with their support, Clarity was able to set up a second centre at Agape Village in Toa Payoh.
Mr Lim Boon Heng, chairman of the cathedral’s fundraising organising committee, presenting a commemorative book to Archbishop William Goh at the fundraising dinner on Nov 6. Photo: GERARD GOHMr Lim Boon Heng, chairman of the cathedral’s fundraising organising committee, presenting a commemorative book to Archbishop William Goh at the fundraising dinner on Nov 6. Photo: GERARD GOHHopes for it to come alive with activities, religious celebrations catering to a wide range of people

The restored Cathedral of the Good Shepherd must be a vibrant place hosting various religious celebrations, and reaching out to youth, the elderly, migrants and expatriates. Catholics from more well-off parishes have a duty to financially support the archdiocese’s “Mother Church”.

These were some salient points made by Archbishop William Goh during a fundraising dinner for the cathedral on Nov 6. Some 430 people attended the event held at The Fullerton Hotel.

“The rectory is almost ready and the main church due for completion next year,” said Archbishop Goh. “One thing is clear for me as the bishop. The cathedral cannot remain as it was before it was renovated, in terms of pastoral engagement, in terms of pastoral activities.”

He said the most important consideration is “how we can regain the cathedral’s status as the ‘mother’, teacher and heart of the Church’s work of evangelisation and liturgical celebrations”.

Firstly, it must be “a welcoming place for everyone … Catholics and non-Catholics alike, rich and poor, young and old”, he said. The cathedral must therefore offer “catechesis, formation, information, guidance and counselling to those who need help, advice and instruction”.
The Catholic Church in Singapore deplores all violence, which is an affront to humanity. All true religions work for peace and harmony, and mutual respect for the individual. Terrorism can never be justified under any circumstances. Our hearts go out to all innocent victims of the carnage. We pray for them and their loved ones as they come to terms with this hate crime, for their healing and for forgiveness of their enemies. We pray also for the perpetrators of this crime against humanity, that God will enlighten them in the truth.