AUGUST 23, 2015, Vol 65, No 17

Archbishop Goh speaking at the Church of the Risen Christ’s day of recollection on Aug 7.Archbishop Goh speaking at the Church of the Risen Christ’s day of recollection on Aug 7.

It was full house at the Church of the Risen Christ on Aug 7 as about 1,000 parishioners took part in a day of recollection conducted by Archbishop William Goh.

The theme was the New Evangelisation.

In his talks, Archbishop Goh addressed mainly three issues: how to respond to a fast-changing world, bringing lost sheep back into the fold, and being equipped for the New Evangelisation.

Many changes have taken place in the world in the last decade, especially in areas such as technology, geopolitics and social media, and more changes are expected ahead. Archbishop Goh warned that the Church needs to be prepared to respond to the challenges brought about by these changes, or risk being overtaken or deemed irrelevant.

These changes include new laws on abortion, contraception, gay rights and same-sex marriage passed in other countries which have divided communities around the world. The Catholic Church has not been spared.
Ursula Sum, a Sec 2 student from CHIJ St Theresa’s Convent, showing Sr Maria Lau and principal Pauline Wong the Trexi dolls with Singapore themes at the Emblems of S’pore display.Ursula Sum, a Sec 2 student from CHIJ St Theresa’s Convent, showing Sr Maria Lau and principal Pauline Wong the Trexi dolls with Singapore themes at the Emblems of S’pore display.

CHIJ St Theresa’s Convent launched Emblems of Singapore, a showcase of student art-works as part of its SG50 celebrations.

Twenty-five of the school’s pioneer teachers and members of the Kampong Bahru and Radin Mas community also attended the Aug 6 event.

Emblems of Singapore, located along one of the school’s corridors, includes a display of painted wooden tiles featuring Singapore themes, 268 Trexi figurines depicting icons such as the Merlion and the NSman, and an 8.5-m-long silhouette of the Singapore skyline with interactive links on local monuments.

Trexi figurines are platform art figures with moveable heads and limbs.

The silhouette of CHIJMES also takes centrestage here, commemorating the establishment of the first IJ (Infant Jesus) convent on the island.
Jackies Low (extreme right) pressing on in the rain with his team mates despite an aching knee.Jackies Low (extreme right) pressing on in the rain with his team mates despite an aching knee.SINGAPORE – After a seven-day walk from Malacca, a team of six boys aged 15-17 and two staff from Boys’ Town arrived back in Singapore on Aug 6.

They made their way to Montfort Secondary School and were joined by over 50 participants from six schools set up by the Brothers of St Gabriel to complete the Singapore leg of the journey.

The 300-km walk commenced at Montfort Youth Centre in Malacca and marked the 300th anniversary of the Brothers of St Gabriel, which set up six schools and Boys’ Town in Singapore.

The group hopes to raise $150,000 for the St Gabriel’s Foundation, which was started in 2001 to take over the running of the institutions here.

Each day, the team would set off at 6 am and walk about 35 km before reaching their destination by 4 pm.
Volunteers working together to collate the food packets at the WestLite Dormitory lobby.Volunteers working together to collate the food packets at the WestLite Dormitory lobby.

While Singapore celebrated the nation’s 50th anniversary on Jubilee Weekend, a group of Catholics came together to commemorate the occasion with the migrant community in Singapore.

On Aug 8, 300 Catholics visited the WestLite Dormitory at Mandai to bring food packets to some 5,300 resident migrant workers.  

The packets comprised essential items such as rice, noodles, sugar, sweeteners, energy drinks, toothpaste, soap and tea powder.

Mr Aung Min Tun, a shipyard supervisor from Myanmar, has been working in Singapore for eight years now and this is the first time he’s seen volunteers bring the special occasion right to their dormitory. “I’m very happy to see so many people come over just to pack and give us these food baskets,” he shared.

For Mr A Maguraj, a lift maintenance worker from India who has been here since 2009, he was “thrilled to receive this special pack” and added that it made him “especially happy to see everybody looking so happy as the nation celebrates her 50th birthday”.
A recent symposium sought to dispel common misconceptions on these issues
Panel discussion during the July 25 symposium: (from left) Ms Kelvyanne Teoh, a counsellor; Mr John Ooi, secretary, Archdiocesan Commission for the Family; and judicial vicar Fr Terence Pereira.Panel discussion during the July 25 symposium: (from left) Ms Kelvyanne Teoh, a counsellor; Mr John Ooi, secretary, Archdiocesan Commission for the Family; and judicial vicar Fr Terence Pereira.
Many people are aware of the biblical teaching on the permanence of marriage: “Therefore what God has joined together, no human being must separate.” (Mark 10:9).

However, when crisis hits and a civil divorce looms, some lose not only hope but also faith.

How then can one remain faithful to God and in full communion with His Church if a civil divorce happens?

This was the subject of a symposium titled What The Catholic Church Actually Teaches About Divorce, Separation and Annulment, held at Catholic Junior College on July 25.

For the more than 250-strong audience, the event was an  opportunity to seek authoritative answers to many burning questions.

Divorced and remarried Catholics “are and remain” members of the Church “because they have received baptism and retain their Christian faith”, judicial vicar Fr Terence Pereira told the crowd.

Other common misconceptions were addressed, such as the notion that any person who had a civil divorce could not receive Holy Communion. In reality, the Church’s teaching is that there is no prohibition for a divorced person who had not remarried.