JUNE 14, 2015, Vol 65, No 12

LOVE
We give this word different meanings. For some, love is a warm fuzzy feeling of affection. But if someone loves us with such an understanding, we would find his love unstable and dependent on his feelings.

We seek a more dependable, lasting and reassuring love. If someone claims to love us, but is not prepared to make even little self-sacrifices for us, we question how sincere that love is. Real love involves self-denial and sacrifice by the lover, even if there is an element of self-interest.

We ourselves find it difficult to discern how much self-interest there is in our love for others. But the more we transcend our self-interest and our selfishness, the more we are able to genuinely seek the well-being of the other, and the more we truly love.
Examples of the Church’s outreach: Caring for the elderly at Villa Francis (left), and serving the sick at Mount Alvernia Hospital.  Examples of the Church’s outreach: Caring for the elderly at Villa Francis (left), and serving the sick at Mount Alvernia Hospital.
The Catholic Church in Singapore has contributed significantly towards nurturing and supporting the community long before national independence in 1965.

The more visible areas are in education, healthcare and social service. Less conspicuous but no less significant is the Church’s moral influence in society and Catholics’ contribution in the public sector.

The archdiocesan SG50 team is putting together a three-part series featuring the views of Catholics on how the Church has helped in nation building.

Here, we feature thoughts about the Church’s involvement in healthcare and social service, to be followed by reflections on its contributions to education and public service, and faith and moral formation, in subsequent issues.
Sr Geraldine Lim, FDCCSr Geraldine Lim, FDCCWhen was the last time you had fun?
Very often I have fun in my ministry, because of the nature of my involvement in the pastoral care of primary school children. Much of my presence in the school is in the canteen.

Name an occasion you felt embarrassed/humiliated.
This happened many years ago when I was about to step down from a role I was in. It was the process and the way it was done that made me feel humiliated and embarrassed.

Name an occasion/incident when you felt God was far away.
This happened about the same time when I was to step down from my ministry. For a period of time I felt far away from God. It was a time when I was so immersed in the ministry, with little support. Day in and day out, my mind was on the work – how to deal with persons and situations. Prayer was just to be physically present in the chapel. My mind and heart were far away.
LTC (Dr) Adrian Tan, an orthopaedic surgeon, shares his experience treating Nepal quake victims

LTC (Dr) Adrian Tan attends to a patient in Gorkana, Nepal. Photo: SINGAPORE ARMED FORCESLTC (Dr) Adrian Tan attends to a patient in Gorkana, Nepal. Photo: SINGAPORE ARMED FORCES
Last year, Lieutenant Colonel (LTC) (Dr) Adrian Tan spent a month in Kathmandu, Nepal, discovering its natural wonders,  marvelling at its historic heritage and experiencing the warmth of its people.

The parishioner from Church of the Holy Cross returned this year to find it unrecognisable in some parts, with many of the famous ancient structures destroyed, and the people he mingled with rendered mostly homeless.

LTC (Dr) Tan, an orthopaedic surgeon, led a team of 30 doctors, nurses and medics under the Singapore Armed Forces’ medical mission to Nepal from April 26 to May 11, following a devastating earthquake.

Said LTC (Dr) Tan, “When I first saw [the earthquake] in the news, I knew that I wanted to be part of this [medical mission]. I’ve experienced the country.  It has done wonders to me during the time I was there.”
Above: CHIJ Queen of Peace singing Hold on to Our Dream during the finale. Below: Cover of the cookbook. Above: CHIJ Queen of Peace singing Hold on to Our Dream during the finale. Below: Cover of the cookbook.

School launches new cookbook during dinner

CHIJ Our Lady Queen of Peace (CHIJ OLQP) celebrated its 60th anniversary by launching its very own cookbook during a May 29 dinner, held at Blossom Garden.

The Infant Jesus (IJ) Sisters and board of management, current and past school staff, former pupils from batches as early as 1968 and two national bowlers were among those in attendance.

The cookbook titled Relish! A Taste of IJ OLQP, was put together by the school’s National Education Committee as an SG50 project.

It features family recipes including Malay and Indian cuisines. The recipes were submitted by school staff, parents, alumni and partners of the school.