JULY 13, 2014, Vol 64 No 14

  1. The issue of homosexuality and the moral evaluation of homosexual acts have increasingly become a matter of public debate, even in Catholic circles. Since this debate often advances arguments and makes assertions inconsistent with the teaching of the Catholic Church, it is quite rightly a cause for concern to all engaged in the pastoral ministry, and this Congregation has judged it to be of sufficiently grave and widespread importance to address to the Bishops of the Catholic Church this Letter on the Pastoral Care of Homosexual Persons.

  2. Naturally, an exhaustive treatment of this complex issue cannot be attempted here, but we will focus our reflection within the distinctive context of the Catholic moral perspective. It is a perspective which finds support in the more secure findings of the natural sciences, which have their own legitimate and proper methodology and field of inquiry.

    However, the Catholic moral viewpoint is founded on human reason illumined by faith and is consciously motivated by the desire to do the will of God our Father. The Church is thus in a position to learn from scientific discovery but also to transcend the horizons of science and to be confident that her more global vision does greater justice to the rich reality of the human person in his spiritual and physical dimensions, created by God and heir, by grace, to eternal life.
CN, June 15CN, June 15
It seems that many of our young people associate attending Mass with a social gathering and not much more (Young People Who Don’t Attend Church, CN, June 15).

Reasons like being bored, not enjoying themselves, a homily that is too long and which they cannot relate to, no friend to go along with, even preferring to do other things because going to church seems meaningless – show that they believe that Sunday church attendance is something they can do without.

But Mass is not about socialising nor is it about feelings. Mass is worship of God, a celebration of the Holy Eucharist, a commemoration of our redemption from sin for our salvation.

It is about thanking God for His love and mercy, for the countless times He has forgiven us when we have done wrong, for all the graces and blessings He has showered on each and everyone of us, undeserving as we may be, for our intellect, our health, our family and friends, and all our material goods.
Some of the participants at St Anne’s Church’s Hair for Hope event: (from left) Ms Lestrine Tan, Mr Joseph Phay, Mr Ronald Tan, Mrs Gertrude Le Vos, Mr Phillip Tan and Mr Bernard Le Vos.Some of the participants at St Anne’s Church’s Hair for Hope event: (from left) Ms Lestrine Tan, Mr Joseph Phay, Mr Ronald Tan, Mrs Gertrude Le Vos, Mr Phillip Tan and Mr Bernard Le Vos.For the first time since its inception in 2003, Hair for Hope, Children’s Cancer Foundation’s (CCF) signature annual fundraiser, welcomed a church onboard as a satellite partner.

 More than 100 St Anne’s Church parishioners made their bald statements on June 22, to raise childhood cancer awareness and funds for CCF beneficiaries and their families.

“We want to share love and mercy with others, especially through acts of caring and sharing. What a beautiful way to be close to children with cancer through this fundraising event,” said parish priest Fr Francis Lee.
He had wanted to “pay attention to places to pray and places of learning”, said Fr Joachim Chang, parish priest of the Church of Our Lady Queen of Peace.

In an interview with CatholicNews on the soon-to-be-completed renovations in the main church, canteen and parish hall, he said it all started with the “aircon breaking down”, after which they were told by Singapore Civil Defence Force that they had to rewire certain parts of the church. 
Parish priest Fr Joachim Chang said that the upgraded parts of the Church of Our Lady Queen of Peace include: (Clockwise from top) the church’s exterior, the altar, the interior of the main church and the parish hall.Parish priest Fr Joachim Chang said that the upgraded parts of the Church of Our Lady Queen of Peace include: (Clockwise from top) the church’s exterior, the altar, the interior of the main church and the parish hall.Therefore, in conjunction with the parish’s 60th anniversary this year, they decide to “renew the place”. The last renovation of the church was 17 years ago.
Above: Players on the field. Right: Bowing heads in prayer.Above: Players on the field. Right: Bowing heads in prayer.
Thirty-seven teams of altar servers from 14 parishes took part in a gruelling futsal tournament on June 28 at SAFRA Tampines.

Popularly known as the Archbishop’s Cup, close to 300 spectators including priests turned up for the tournament, with Archbishop William Goh stressing in his opening message the importance of building bonds as members of the Body of Christ.

He also reminded participants who they were playing for and that the objective was not solely to score goals and win trophies.

As the tournament commenced, the battle between the different teams was intense as the various teams from the different categories did their best to qualify for the final goal – a spot in the finals.

Just like last year, the 19-and-under category final was an all Church of Our Lady Queen of Peace and Church of the Holy Family affair.

After a gruelling 14-minute match, the team from Church of Our Lady Queen of Peace was the reigning champion, clinching the coveted Champions Trophy.