Schools

School Is Overcrowded. Modern Extension Soon
 
The girls at St. Anthony's are unanimous on this point: "The School is stuffy and crowded ... and yet, we do love it all the more! So old, so unassuming, the old dear!"

Sandwiched as it is between four main roads, St. Anthony's Convent is indeed as noisy as it could be. But one quickly gets used to the din from the road, and everybody feels a sort of pride in boasting of high figures, even if figures when applied to people may mean less space. "The more the merrier" is a proverb that fits the Convent: 850 pupils and 750 in the Afternoon! This is really something to be proud of.

I was told that soon there will be a new extension to the school building, with spacious, covered playgrounds, bright classrooms, rooms for Domestic Science, Biology, Art, Music, a Library .. . It will be like heaven, too good to be true. And the pupils bravely face the present stiffness hoping for the best.
Post-War Youth The Big Problem
Proposed Singapore Boys' Town M.S. 9 ½ mls. Bukit Timah 22Proposed Singapore Boys' Town M.S. 9 ½ mls. Bukit Timah 22
No one doubts that in Singapore to-day one of our greatest educational and social problems is that of our post-war youth. War has mowed down heads of families, it has created an over-age class among boys and, though existing schools and homes have displayed a magnificent and heroic effort to lend a helping hand to both parents and children, the problem still remains very acute and a solution must be found.

Furthermore even among the boys who are fortunate enough to find admission in schools, a fairly high percentage will never reach the higher standards because their talents are such that they soon attain the maximum curve of assimilation of knowledge which leaves them dragging behind brighter schoolmates. What chances are open to them in the future? Are they not liable to become a neglected and burdensome element in our youth?

Through no fault of their own, orphans, poor boys, averaged pupils, "problem" lads have but a bleak future ahead of them unless something is done now to come to their rescue. BOYS' TOWN aims at bringing a timely solution to that urgent problem: a TOWN for boys where under kindly guidance and competent instructors they can be educated, fed, cared for, and where they can learn a trade and become useful citizens.
TO MANY the word "convent" brings to mind a picture of austerity and silence, of gloomy .repression, of long grey corridors along which the nuns, heads bowed, glide unsubstantially wrapped in perpetual contemplation of the spirit.

They remember perhaps subconsciously the Victorian lithograph, which showed a wan and wistful nun lifting her eyes from her book of devotions and gazing with envy and yearning at a young mother rapturously clasping her beautiful infant, who happens curiously enough to be passing the open door of her convent cell. The picture was succinctly entitled "Two Heavens".
Office-bearers of the Catholic Teachers' Movement: Standing (L to R) Messrs Jacob Chng, Peter Leong Patrick Mowe Joseph D'Cruz al!d Valentine T!ln. Seated, Miss Shirley Tan: Mr. Lawrence Sla, Fr. L. Amlotte and Miss Teresa Chin.Office-bearers of the Catholic Teachers' Movement: Standing (L to R) Messrs Jacob Chng, Peter Leong Patrick Mowe Joseph D'Cruz al!d Valentine T!ln. Seated, Miss Shirley Tan: Mr. Lawrence Sla, Fr. L. Amlotte and Miss Teresa Chin.
At the recent Annual General Meeting of the Catholic Teachers’ Movement held in S'pore, the following were elected office-bearers of the movement: President, Mr. Lawrence Sia; Vice-president, Mr. Valentine'Tan'; Organising Secretary, Mr. Jacob Chng; General Secretary Mr. Patrick Mowe; Asst. Secretary, Mr. Joseph D'Cruz; Treasurer, Mr. Peter Leong; Asst. Treasurer, Miss Shirley Tan' Chairman Katong Work Group, Miss Teresa Chin; Chaplain, Rev. L. Amiotte.

The new committee of the Catholic Teachers' Movement are making plans to organise a day of recollection and a carolling party. Detailed circulars regarding these will be posted to members. Should there be need, however, for further information, members are kindly requested to contact Mr, Jacob Chng, c/o. Montfort School, Upper Serangoon. Rd., Singapore and Mr. Patrick Mowe, Catholic Centre, 73, Bras Basah Rd., S'pore.

The Committee also appeals to all Catholic teachers to help strengthen and consolidate the movement by being members, by participating in its activities and getting others also to join it.

The Malayan CatholicNews, Sunday, November 27, 1960. Page 4.

A Brief History Of Its Foundation

THE Brothers of St. Gabriel, on the invitation of Right Rev. A. Devals, Bishop of Malacca, and with the approval of the Department of Education, are taking up the management of the Holy Innocents English School, Upper Serangoon Rd., Singapore, as from January 1st 1937; the formal reopening day of the school being January 18th.Bro. John Vrebeuf, Rev. Bro. Gerard Majelkt (Director), and Bro Adolfus of the Holy Innocents School, SerangoonBro. John Vrebeuf, Rev. Bro. Gerard Majelkt (Director), and Bro Adolfus of the Holy Innocents School, Serangoon

As the Order of the Brothers of St. Gabriel, though very well known in Siam, in India,.etc. is a new comer in the Diocese' of Malacca, it is expected that a few brief notes about its foundation, developments and general activities will be of some interest to the readers of the Malaya Catholic Leader.

The Founder of the Order of the Brothers of St. Gabriel is -Blessed Louis Grignion de Montfort who was born at Montfortsur-Meu, in Brittany on January 1673. After a few years in the Jesuits' College at Rennes, he went to Paris where under the renowned guidance of the Sulpician Fathers he prepared himself for the priesthood.