JUNE 17, 2012, Vol 62, No 12

Growing up, I often wondered, “What so great about being a man when society is biased against him?” As it were, the law favors and protects women more; a masculine movement is seldom heard of to advocate the wellbeing of men; and there seems to be a perception that men are predisposed to “receiving” more in relationships than giving, especially in sexual relationships.

These questions did not help me as a young growing male individual learning about himself as a guy and trying to understand his being, let alone appreciate the purpose of God’s plan for him in creating and designing him as a man. Sure! There are all the teachings of male sexuality and his place in society, but what so great about manhood?

It was not until I got married and had my first son, that I gained a greater understanding of the greatness that men have been called to. I realised I had asked the wrong question all along. The question should have been, “Are men called to greatness in the first place?” In fact, I would have been able to answer the first question only if I first knew the kind of greatness that men have been called to. In my prayers and reflections, it’s come upon me that men have been made for and called to such greatness that sometimes I wonder even if I am fit to be a man.
Ms Charlene Chew came on board on June 1.Ms Charlene Chew came on board on June 1.The Archdiocese of Singapore has appointed a new communications manager.

Ms Charlene Chew came on board on June 1 and brings with her years of public relations experience having previously worked with a public relations consultancy and Singapore Press Holdings.

She has a Bachelor of Arts (Honours) from the National University of Singapore where she majored in English Language and Literature. She also holds a Master of Science in Public Relations from the University of Colorado, USA.

She spent two years working in the US in the Communications Office on the university campus as well as in the Corporate Affairs Department of the local community hospital.

 Singing for Christian unity (clockwise from top left): choirs from Barker Road Methodist Church, St Thomas Orthodox Syrian Cathedral, Church of St Ignatius, CSI Immanuel Congregation and Church of St Mary of the Angels. This was the second such concert organised. The first was held last year. Photos: JOON JOEL MOSQUEDA Singing for Christian unity (clockwise from top left): choirs from Barker Road Methodist Church, St Thomas Orthodox Syrian Cathedral, Church of St Ignatius, CSI Immanuel Congregation and Church of St Mary of the Angels. This was the second such concert organised. The first was held last year. Photos: JOON JOEL MOSQUEDA

The Night of Songs for Christian Unity was a moving experience for the
St Mary of the Angels’ Children’s Choir, says its coordinator Carolyn Seow


ALTHOUGH I was in the midst of a gathering of people from diverse backgrounds, I had never felt such a strong sense of “oneness” before.

It was indeed a beautiful Saturday evening that June 2 at the Lutheran Church of Our Redeemer.

The Night of Songs for Christian Unity, initiated by the archdiocese’s Committee for Ecumenical Movement, turned out to be more than just a “night of songs” for me and others.
Frs Mbwi Khohi (second from left) and Benedict Hsu (third from left) answering the press during the demonstration (Photo: courtesy of Huang Chi-shan/UCAN)Frs Mbwi Khohi (second from left) and Benedict Hsu (third from left) answering the press during the demonstration (Photo: courtesy of Huang Chi-shan/UCAN)TAICHUNG, TAIWAN – Around 3,000 Catholics from across Taiwan took to the streets of Taichung on May 26 demanding city authorities intervene in the alleged seizure of a church in the municipality’s Nantun district by a private developer.

Fr Benedict Hsu, vicar-general of Taichung diocese, delivered a petition letter to City Hall containing the signatures of 25,000 supporters, demanding that the Mother of God Church be saved.

The three-hour march demonstrated a greater show of force by Catholics following a smaller scale protest by local parishioners from the church during Holy Week.

“If it happens to the Nantun church today”, it could happen to another church tomorrow, said Fr Mbwi Khohi, a Congolese priest based in Nantun district.

“There could be more Church lands grabbed by consortium-developers who have been casting greedy eyes on them,” he said.
Pilgrims pray around a statue of Mary on Apparition Hill in Medjugorje. CNS photoPilgrims pray around a statue of Mary on Apparition Hill in Medjugorje. CNS photoVATICAN CITY – To help bishops determine the credibility of alleged Marian apparitions, the Vatican has translated and published procedural rules from 1978 that had previously been available only in Latin.

More than 1,500 visions of Mary have been reported around the world, but in the past century only nine cases have received church approval as worthy of belief.

According to the newly translated norms, published recently on www.doctrinafidei.va, the local bishop should set up a commission of experts, including theologians, canonists, psychologists and doctors, to help him determine the facts, the mental, moral and spiritual wholesomeness and seriousness of the visionary, and whether the message and testimony are free from theological and doctrinal error.

A bishop can come to one of three conclusions: He can determine the apparition to be true and worthy of belief; he can say it is not true, which leaves open the possibility for an appeal; or he can say that at the moment he doesn’t know and needs more help.