Mr Sudip Chandro Bhandro Joy (right) seen here with his brother. An anonymous donor gave Mr Sudip $6,000 after learning about his plight after he was attacked.Mr Sudip Chandro Bhandro Joy (right) seen here with his brother. An anonymous donor gave Mr Sudip $6,000 after learning about his plight after he was attacked.The Bangladeshi worker who was attacked by two men is now able to pay off his medical costs and even looks forward to setting up a small business back home, thanks to a Catholic donor.

Mr Sudip Chandro Bhandro Joy was viciously attacked and robbed by two men on May 15.

A Straits Times report on Aug 11 noted that he suffered injuries to his cheeks, nose and head and has been on medical leave since the incident.

The construction worker is also experiencing numbness in his upper jaw and is unable to eat solid food.

After reading the news report, a Catholic woman contacted the Archdiocesan Commission for the Pastoral Care of Migrants and Itinerant People (ACMI), offering to donate $6,000 to Mr Sudip.

The donor wishes to remain anonymous, said ACMI executive director Jeremy Khoo.

On Aug 21, ACMI arranged for a meeting between the donor, Mr Sudip and his younger brother, Mr Pradip Bhadra Milton Gonesh Bhadra, who is also a construction worker in Singapore.

With the money, Mr Sudip was able to pay his brother back the $2,000 the latter had forked out to cover the medical bills, said Mr Khoo.

Mr Sudip remitted the balance to his family in Bangladesh.

He will use $2,500 to settle his mortgage payments back home and put aside the remainder to set up a small sundry and clothing store, said Mr Khoo.

“I was very worried about losing my sight because the [attackers] damaged my eyes, and with no money I was concerned about losing my home as well because I couldn’t pay the mortgage,” Mr Sudip told CatholicNews in a telephone interview.

The father of two girls aged one and four said he and his family now feel a great sense of relief, thanks to the donation.

“I feel that new life has been given to me!” he said.

Mr Sudip has a medical appointment in September, and if the doctor gives him a clean bill of health, he will return to start life anew in Bangladesh, said Mr Khoo.

By Martin See
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