I CONGRATULATE YOU on the coverage of "The Da Vinci Code" so far, in terms of articles, readers' feedback and the strategic advertisement of "The Da Vinci Deception". I must thank Marjorie Lim ("Looking on the bright side", CN, May 14) for bringing to the notice of the larger Catholic community the fact "The Da Vinci Code" is on the reading list of a Catholic secondary school.

I wonder if it is also the case in other Catholic schools. Hopefully, watchful parents, aware of how "The Da Vinci Code" can undermine the faith of their children, would have raised the alarm. Public outcry must now throw its weight behind them. Just as a huge advertisement of the film seen on the facade of a Catholic church in renovation in Rome was removed because of the scandal it caused, so too, Catholic schools in Singapore should realise their mistake and withdraw the book.

We do not need the hierarchy to tell us to boycott the film - each of us can choose not to watch it because we are not going to support something that takes pot shots at Our Lord. In fact, I believe that it is better for the hierarchy not to issue a boycott: besides arousing curiosity and thus fanning viewership, there are bound to be Catholics who will watch the film and a boycott will become one more thing that puts them at odds with the church.

On the other hand, I do not think it is correct for CatholicNews to try to be impartial on this topic and run a story "Opus Dei priest says it's OK to see the movie" to balance the main story "Vatican official suggests Catholics boycott 'The Da Vinci Code film'." As a Catholic newspaper, you can and should take a stand on this issue.

In fact, it would seem that in the haste to present the other side of the coin, you have misrepresented Father Flader. I cannot find anything in the story to back up the headline. In the last paragraph, he is merely advising movie viewers what to do to avoid being contaminated; he is not advocating that they  contaminate themselves.

I have read "The Da Vinci Deception" and it is excellent - informative without being too wordy while giving both an overview and refuting specific errors.

Suzanne Ooi

Editor's note: Suzanne Ooi is right in saying that the headline CN used misrepresented what Father Flader actually said in the article. It was an oversight. (See "Wrong headline"). But she is wrong to say that we have not taken a stand on "The Da Vinci Code" or that we acted "in haste to present the other side of the coin". Our stand as a Catholic newspaper is reflected in the selection of articles that we have published.

Suzanne Ooi is right in saying that the headline CN used misrepresented what Father Flader actually said in the article. It was an oversight. (See ""). But she is wrong to say that we have not taken a stand on "The Da Vinci Code" or that we acted "in haste to present the other side of the coin". Our stand as a Catholic newspaper is reflected in the selection of articles that we have published.

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