Small group sharings during a session presented by Fr Terence Pereira on work and the Church.Small group sharings during a session presented by Fr Terence Pereira on work and the Church.
There needs to be a change in the way work is viewed.

Work must be an avenue for self-realisation, a platform to make the world a better place.

Fr Terence Pereira made this point in his talk on work and the Church at the Church of the Holy Cross on Aug 2.

A constant obsession with cost effectiveness, customer satisfaction and improvement have now become the thought for the day, he told his 80-strong audience.  The challenge of such a work situation often sees people neglecting other important aspects of life such as family, friends and church, to become part of the workaholic treadmill, he said.

Fr Terence was speaking in the last of a series of five talks called Bridging Your Life with Christ, organised by the parish. Previous talks have seen other priests speaking on various aspects of work and life.

He stressed that work primarily involves participation in the divine work of salvation, an activity directed to service of mankind. Work is an expression of a person’s dignity, and should allow people to realise their humanity.

The purpose of work is to make people better beings, he said.

It is important to appreciate one’s gifts and talents and use it for the good of the community, he added. This marks the conversion from activity to spirituality, in which people begin to serve as disciples of God fulfilling His plan for them, he said.

In his talk, Fr Terence noted that a disciple is one who accepts another as a master.

To have Jesus as one’s master requires knowledge of Scripture. As one does so and contemplates on His works, Jesus comes alive in one’s heart, he said.

Commenting on the talk, Ms Daria Wong, a member of the audience, noted that bringing one’s spirituality into work is still a challenge as people here are living in a secular society.

By Reno Antony

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