JULY 24, 2016, Vol 66, No 15

Fr Andrew Wong, parish priest of the Church of the Holy Spirit, blessing two girls in wheelchairs as they presented the offertory. Fr Andrew Wong, parish priest of the Church of the Holy Spirit, blessing two girls in wheelchairs as they presented the offertory.

About 200 people, comprising mainly families with special needs members and their supporters, attended a special event for them on July 9 at the Church of the Holy Spirit.

The Everyone is Special event was conceived by parish priest Fr Andrew Wong who wanted to dedicate it to family members with special needs in this Jubilee Year of Mercy.

Fr Andrew started the event with Mass. Two boys with special needs were altar servers. Theodore Wong, a teenager with autism, proclaimed the first reading and two girls in wheelchairs presented the offertory.

In his homily, Fr Andrew emphasised that people with special needs and their families were part of the parishes. Just because they might not be seen at Mass does not mean they are not there.
Fr Richards Ambrose speaking to participants of the July 9 seminar at the Church of the Holy Cross.Fr Richards Ambrose speaking to participants of the July 9 seminar at the Church of the Holy Cross.

SINGAPORE – “If a doctor tells you tomorrow that you have one year left to live, do you think you will let life happen to you?” asked Fr Richards Ambrose.

He posed this question to 230 people, gathered for a seminar titled Discipleship at the Workplace held on July 9 at the Church of the Holy Cross.

The seminar was to launch ABLAZE, the parish’s new young adults ministry.

Fr Richards introduced the seminar by shedding light on topics of Christian identity – discerning and living out God’s will, identifying spiritual values in jobs and what true joy and contentment really are.
Alumnae of the Canossian Alumni Association figuring out their hints during the Canossian Heritage Race for Funds held on July 9. Alumnae of the Canossian Alumni Association figuring out their hints during the Canossian Heritage Race for Funds held on July 9.

Instead of a themed dinner or dance party, this year’s Canossian’s Connect, an annual event of the Canossian Alumni Association, took place outdoors in a form of a race.

The Canossian Heritage Race for Funds was held on July 9 and the flag off was at the parochial house of St Joseph’s Church, Victoria Street.

The event was fashioned after The Amazing Race, a popular reality show.

Participants were made up of teachers, nuns and ex-students of St Anthony’s Canossian Secondary School (SAC) with graduates from 1972 to 2014, as well as children of alumni who are still studying in Canossian primary schools.
Have notices advising parishioners to be punctual for Masses.Have notices advising parishioners to be punctual for Masses.The number of Catholics coming to church late for Mass seems to be increasing. Those parishioners entering the church during the Gospel readings are a disgrace and totally disrespectful. 

All latecomers should understand that they are distracting other parishioners who may be in silent prayer.

I am sure that all parishioners appreciate the voluntary work carried out by the church wardens in guiding parishioners to their seats as well as other duties.

From my observations, many wardens are treating these disrespectful late comers as “VIPS” by guiding them to look for seats. Some wardens will even bring them to the front of the pews to get a seat with a vantage view of the Mass.
Among those with Archbishop William Goh at the dedication Mass were (at the altar from left) Fr Edward Lim, Fr Ignatius Yeo and Deacon Cornelius Ching.Among those with Archbishop William Goh at the dedication Mass were (at the altar from left) Fr Edward Lim, Fr Ignatius Yeo and Deacon Cornelius Ching.

After two years of renovations, the Church of Sts Peter and Paul held its dedication Mass on June 29.

About 1,000 people attended the Mass of the Dedication of Church and Altar, and many could be seen smiling as they entered the newly refurbished 146-year-old building.

Some of the new features in the church include a high marble altar, black-and-white cement-tiled flooring, a new rose stained-glass window on the front façade of the church, and air-conditioning.
Catholic Junior College students and their beneficiaries from Al-aqsho orphanage in Batam. Catholic Junior College students and their beneficiaries from Al-aqsho orphanage in Batam.

Catholic Junior College (CJC) students recently held an exhibition on human trafficking.

Partnering with EmancipAsia, a local non-governmental organisation, the exhibition was displayed at the school foyer from June 27-July 15 and was an initiative of 21 CJC students to raise awareness of the issue.

It aimed to underscore the relevance of human trafficking to Singapore and also sought to encourage the CJC community to play a part in ending it.

In May, a student-initiated service learning project saw CJC students travelling to Batam to aid orphans and exploited women.
104-year-old building conserved to protect Singapore’s built heritage

The parochial house of St Joseph’s Church (Victoria Street) was officially gazetted on June 30.The parochial house of St Joseph’s Church (Victoria Street) was officially gazetted on June 30.

The parochial house of St Joseph’s Church (Victoria Street) was gazetted as part of the Urban Redevelopment Authority’s (URA) efforts to protect Singapore’s built heritage.

The announcement was officially made at the church on June 30.

Minister for National Development Lawrence Wong was the guest-of-honour at the event.

In his address, he highlighted the significance of the 104-year-old building.

“It has survived World War II and three generations” and is “a testament to the multi-ethnic roots and the open, inclusive nature of Singapore,” he said.
Author Clement Liew presenting a copy of his book on St Joseph Church (Bukit Timah) to Archbishop William Goh on July 3.Author Clement Liew presenting a copy of his book on St Joseph Church (Bukit Timah) to Archbishop William Goh on July 3.St Joseph Church (Bukit Timah) has launched a comprehensively researched book on its own history as part of its 170th anniversary celebrations, 

The author, Church historian Clement Liew, presented a copy of the book to Archbishop William Goh during the 11 am Confirmation Mass on July 3.

In his preface to the book, titled Mission on a Hill Far, Far Away, Dr Liew said the aim was to produce a work that the general Catholic community could appreciate, and also to help parishioners know the story of their church and community.

Mission on a Hill is about the journey of a church community, that had settled in the interior of Singapore almost two centuries ago, growing from a once isolated mission to a thriving parish today.

The book traces how French priest, Fr Anatole Mauduit, set up the first missionary chapel in 1846 for a small group of Chinese Christians and potential converts.
An evening worship session at Catholic Youth Day led by young people from different communities. Photo: ALEXANDRIA NEOHAn evening worship session at Catholic Youth Day led by young people from different communities. Photo: ALEXANDRIA NEOH

It was a time of joy and praise as young Catholics of Singapore celebrated Catholic Youth Day.

Organised by the Office for Young People (OYP), the July 2-3 event attracted about 2,000 participants.

The theme, Once No People, Now God’s People, was chosen in hopes of promoting a deeper sense of belonging to one Church as well as to celebrate the Christian life and faith among young people.

Archbishop William Goh celebrated Mass to open the evening event. He reminded participants that as a pilgrim people, they must travel light because they are all on a journey to God. As a sign of solidarity, the congregation, together with Archbishop Goh prayed a blessing upon the pilgrims who will carry the mission and spirit of the Church of Singapore to World Youth Day in Krakow, Poland in late July.

A look at some of the historic religious items available for viewing when the cathedral is restored


The ring and crosier used by the first Archbishop of Singapore, Archbishop Michael Olcomendy; the Mass booklet Pope St John Paul II used when he was in Singapore in 1986; and a brass crucifix with candlesticks given by the Government of the French Republic in 1897, the year of the cathedral’s consecration.

These are some of the lesser known religious artefacts at the Cathedral of the Good Shepherd that Mr Jevon Liew, a volunteer for about 13 years, has unearthed. Together with other artefacts, they will be available for public viewing at the cathedral’s heritage gallery centre next year after the restored building is officially dedicated.

For Mr Liew, discovering these items has deepened his appreciation of the history of the Catholic Church here, and he hopes others viewing the artefacts will be similarly enriched.